Gluten free, dairy free breakfasts. Option 2 – Scotch or American style pancakes 1

feedingmyintolerantchild:

The children have requested I make this version this evening as their Shrove Tuesday treat. Could hardly refuse. Zac has skin prick tests this afternoon, so need to have something to cheer him up when we get home!

Originally posted on feeding my intolerant child:

Before I was brave enough to make my own gluten free, dairy free pancakes, I gave a packet mix a try. http://www.halenhearty.co.uk/our_range/products/5-grain_pancake_mix/ They were good, just a bit thick and very ‘grainy’ tasting. I think the children were slightly put off by the bits. After that I decided it was time to be brave and try and make my own. I found a crepe style pancake recipe on the Doves Farm website and have never looked back. Over time I have started to feel confident with this recipe – but I did once have a bit of a hiccup. I used self-raising flour instead of plain and accidentally discovered how to make Scotch pancakes or American style pancakes!

The batter was much thicker than normal and it just sat in the frying pan rather than travelling around. I could tell it was cooking because little bubbles started to appear and…

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Gluten free, dairy free breakfasts. Option 1 – pancakes Reply

feedingmyintolerantchild:

As it is Pancake Day I thought I should put this up again. My Intolerant Child and his sister have both requested pancakes tonight, so I will need to look at it again very soon!

Originally posted on feeding my intolerant child:

So here we go. The first chapter of the Feeding My Intolerant child book/guide. I decided to start with breakfasts, because I don’t know about you but the first thought that pops in to my head when I wake up is – what am I going to eat today? It seems to be the first thing my children think of too, as their first words to me each day tend to be ‘I’m hungry’.

When you are told by the doctor and dietician that your little one needs to go on a gluten free and dairy free diet, you instantly wonder what on earth they can eat. It doesn’t seem to leave much. One of the most difficult meals to deal with, in my opinion, is breakfast. For many of us breakfast is usually some kind of wheat or gluten based cereal or grain served or made with dairy –…

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My intolerant child and his bloated tummy. 2

Zac has a bloated tummy. He has had it since he was born. Some days are worse than others. Before we were 100% dairy free and gluten free it used to go up and down like a balloon and he definitely suffered from cramps even though he was too young to tell me. He would pull his legs up, thrash around and groan in his sleep. Now he can tell me. He doesn’t say it often but has been saying it more and more lately – despite the fact he is gluten free and dairy free. Some nights he is so peaceful and sleeps soundly but on the nights he wakes and wanders in to us, you can guarantee that it also coincides with the nights he has gone to bed with a slightly bigger than normal tummy.

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Pruritus, atopic eczema and boils Reply

It has been several months since Zac last had a skin infection. We did think/hope that we had found a way to prevent them, even though we know we have no idea what really causes them. We met Dr Adam Fox back in September and told him how Zac had been plagued by recurrent skin infections, which are essentially boils. He explained to us how everybody’s skin is partially colonised by ‘staphs’ but that Zac’s skin must be excessively colonised and also more prone to letting them in. He suffers with a kind of atopic eczema, which gives him pruritus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itch), a sensation of chronic itchiness, so he scratches all the time. I guess he creates tiny little tears in the very delicate layers of his skin and then the ‘germs’ penetrate and take hold. This is the link to the post that explained it all.

http://feedingmyintolerantchild.com/2013/09/08/the-outcome-of-our-latest-appointment/

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Making gluten free, dairy free bread – again. 2

Last year I was given a bread machine by my mother in law. The whole family, when catering for Zac, has experienced the frustration of spending £3 on a tiny loaf that falls apart before you can do anything with it, and has great big holes in the slices. My mother in law had a bread machine of her own and suggested I borrow it and see if I could make something more usable and tasty. A lot of the gluten free breads taste pretty rough. So I had a go and the result was pretty disastrous. I blamed the machine! It didn’t have a setting for gluten free bread and I guess that is pretty crucial as the process is quite different.

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